&noscript=1 /> Farm Holidays in Passeiertal valley Farm Holidays in Passeiertal valley
 
Farm Holidays in Passeiertal valley
Farm Holidays in Passeiertal valley

Nature without end

A place of adventure

Passeiertal valley

Farm Holidays in Passeiertal valley

You can expect hiking and high-action sports, unspoilt spots far away from the madding crowd and plenty of rural tradition on a Farm Holiday in Passeiertal valley. 

Passeiertal valley is one of the most rustic and varied valleys in South Tyrol in terms of landscape. The home of Andreas Hofer, the famous Tyrolean freedom fighter, stretches between the Ötztal and Sarntal Alps 50 kilometres northwards from Meran. The climate at the start of the valley is a Mediterranean one, with vines and fruit thriving, while in the unadulterated further reaches of the valley, the temperatures and weather conditions take on a more Alpine character. Here, farmers make a living from livestock farming. 

You can expect hiking and high-action sports, unspoilt spots far away from the madding crowd and plenty of rural tradition on a Farm Holiday in Passeiertal valley. 

Passeiertal valley is one of the most rustic and varied valleys in South Tyrol in terms of landscape. The home of Andreas Hofer, the famous Tyrolean freedom fighter, stretches between the Ötztal and Sarntal Alps 50 kilometres northwards from Meran. The climate at the start of the valley is a Mediterranean one, with vines and fruit thriving, while in the unadulterated further reaches of the valley, the temperatures and weather conditions take on a more Alpine character. Here, farmers make a living from livestock farming. 

 

There are around 50 mountain pastures in the whole valley surrounded by extensive fields of Alpine roses and mountain fans can choose between easy walks and high Alpine tours or even climbs. The rural area has a variety of options for Farm Holiday guests in store: there are holiday flats in Kuens, the smallest municipality of South Tyrol, likewise in Moos, Riffian, St. Leonard and the largest municipality of St. Martin.

 

Traditional costume and 'Goaßln'
Lots of farmers still live and work on their farms on the steep slopes of the Passeiertal valley. Hay often used to be brought in using cable winches that were powered by water. These days, things are a bit easier for the people living there: just about everywhere there are paths that are accessible for tractors. Hay is frequently still harvested by hand and a few farmers rely on a goods cable lift to deliver their milk to the valley. A Farm Holiday in Passeiertal will allow guests to witness all the different processes involved in daily life on a mountain farm. You'll often come across shaggy Passeiertal valley  mountain goats, which have been part of the Dolomites landscape in South Tyrol for centuries and are now being increasingly ousted by their short-haired relatives.

The number of locals concerned about upholding customs shows how the people of Passeiertal valley are still very much attached to their traditions and homeland. Young men take part in 'Ranggeln', a traditional Alpine martial art, and 'Goaßlschnölln', or competitive whipcracking, at the many village fetes and festivals. The cracking of the whips used to serve as a signal between mountain huts. Today, it is reserved for special occasions, such as weddings or the 'Almabtrieb' in autumn, when the cows are led down to the valley from the mountains pastures adorned with wreathes and heavy bells.

Lots of Passeiertal valley ocals still wear their traditional costume at fetes and other celebrations, especially musicians, 'Schützen' riflemen and members of the 'Schneeberger Knappen' association.
Staying at a holiday flat or room in Passeiertal valley means having the chance to go from farm to farm accompanied by the farmer and coming across all sorts of sights, such as the tractor museum in Kuens, 'Passeier in St. Leonhard' museum, and the 'Heimatmuseum' in St. Martin or the historical 'Schildhöfe' farmsteads.


Farmsteads reminiscent of fortresses
Most farmsteads here are rather modest and built from wood. A few fortress-like buildings in their midst stick out, however. These are inlaid with ivory and decorated with old sundials or frescoes on their walls. These 'Schildhöfe' are unique in South Tyrol. They were once home to farmers who won special privileges through doing military service. In the 14th century, these eleven farmers were given lifetime exemption from tax duties in return for swearing to serve the the Prince Regnant and to stand by his side in battle. They were elevated to become minor members of the ruling class. There is a pleasant circular walk joining these historical farmsteads.


Hiking, rafting and paragliding
Even though holiday flats or rooms in Passeiertal valley tend to particularly appeal to those seeking peace and quiet, there are still lots of gentle or sportier activities available to cater for different tastes. A variety of paths for the whole family may be found in all of the villages. Experienced mountain hikers set out to conquer the mountains peaks of the Sarntal or Ötztal Alps and the Texelgruppe Nature Park, which is the largest in South Tyrol with an area of over 33,000 hectares. There are paths up to the Spronser See lakes amidst unspoilt countryside or 3,000-metre-high mountains, such as the Roteck or the Hohe Weiße.
Paragliding, kayaking or canyoning in the intriguing gorges of the Passer river will appeal to those in search of a bit of action. Rafting involves steering a dinghy through rapids and waterfalls with a trained guide. Keen golfers can use the 18-hole golf course with all-round views.

In winter, the landscape of the further reaches of Passeiertal valley is deep in snow. Your holiday destination will become a base for snow shoe walks and ski tours all over Passeiertal valley or a day's skiing in Pfelders in Moos in Passeier car-free ski resort. This also features one of the largest ice climbing areas in Europe. Cross-country skiers will appreciate the quiet run in St. Leonhard.

 

 

Why you should take a Farm Holiday in Passiertal valley:

  • A vast number of sporting options: rafting, golf, hiking
  • Ideal for a summer and winter holiday
  • The 'Schildhöfe' houses tell of bygone times

There are around 50 mountain pastures in the whole valley surrounded by extensive fields of Alpine roses and mountain fans can choose between easy walks and high Alpine tours or even climbs. The rural area has a variety of options for Farm Holiday guests in store: there are holiday flats in Kuens, the smallest municipality of South Tyrol, likewise in Moos, Riffian, St. Leonard and the largest municipality of St. Martin.

 

Traditional costume and 'Goaßln'
Lots of farmers still live and work on their farms on the steep slopes of the Passeiertal valley. Hay often used to be brought in using cable winches that were powered by water. These days, things are a bit easier for the people living there: just about everywhere there are paths that are accessible for tractors. Hay is frequently still harvested by hand and a few farmers rely on a goods cable lift to deliver their milk to the valley. A Farm Holiday in Passeiertal will allow guests to witness all the different processes involved in daily life on a mountain farm. You'll often come across shaggy Passeiertal valley  mountain goats, which have been part of the Dolomites landscape in South Tyrol for centuries and are now being increasingly ousted by their short-haired relatives.

The number of locals concerned about upholding customs shows how the people of Passeiertal valley are still very much attached to their traditions and homeland. Young men take part in 'Ranggeln', a traditional Alpine martial art, and 'Goaßlschnölln', or competitive whipcracking, at the many village fetes and festivals. The cracking of the whips used to serve as a signal between mountain huts. Today, it is reserved for special occasions, such as weddings or the 'Almabtrieb' in autumn, when the cows are led down to the valley from the mountains pastures adorned with wreathes and heavy bells.

Lots of Passeiertal valley ocals still wear their traditional costume at fetes and other celebrations, especially musicians, 'Schützen' riflemen and members of the 'Schneeberger Knappen' association.
Staying at a holiday flat or room in Passeiertal valley means having the chance to go from farm to farm accompanied by the farmer and coming across all sorts of sights, such as the tractor museum in Kuens, 'Passeier in St. Leonhard' museum, and the 'Heimatmuseum' in St. Martin or the historical 'Schildhöfe' farmsteads.


Farmsteads reminiscent of fortresses
Most farmsteads here are rather modest and built from wood. A few fortress-like buildings in their midst stick out, however. These are inlaid with ivory and decorated with old sundials or frescoes on their walls. These 'Schildhöfe' are unique in South Tyrol. They were once home to farmers who won special privileges through doing military service. In the 14th century, these eleven farmers were given lifetime exemption from tax duties in return for swearing to serve the the Prince Regnant and to stand by his side in battle. They were elevated to become minor members of the ruling class. There is a pleasant circular walk joining these historical farmsteads.


Hiking, rafting and paragliding
Even though holiday flats or rooms in Passeiertal valley tend to particularly appeal to those seeking peace and quiet, there are still lots of gentle or sportier activities available to cater for different tastes. A variety of paths for the whole family may be found in all of the villages. Experienced mountain hikers set out to conquer the mountains peaks of the Sarntal or Ötztal Alps and the Texelgruppe Nature Park, which is the largest in South Tyrol with an area of over 33,000 hectares. There are paths up to the Spronser See lakes amidst unspoilt countryside or 3,000-metre-high mountains, such as the Roteck or the Hohe Weiße.
Paragliding, kayaking or canyoning in the intriguing gorges of the Passer river will appeal to those in search of a bit of action. Rafting involves steering a dinghy through rapids and waterfalls with a trained guide. Keen golfers can use the 18-hole golf course with all-round views.

In winter, the landscape of the further reaches of Passeiertal valley is deep in snow. Your holiday destination will become a base for snow shoe walks and ski tours all over Passeiertal valley or a day's skiing in Pfelders in Moos in Passeier car-free ski resort. This also features one of the largest ice climbing areas in Europe. Cross-country skiers will appreciate the quiet run in St. Leonhard.

 

 

Why you should take a Farm Holiday in Passiertal valley:

  • A vast number of sporting options: rafting, golf, hiking
  • Ideal for a summer and winter holiday
  • The 'Schildhöfe' houses tell of bygone times
read more read less

Farm search

Holiday farms in Passeiertal valley

Where do you want to go?
When and how long?
any
Type of accommodation and fellow travellers
2 adults
Type of farm
Cattle farming, wine and fruit growing
Classification
all classification
0 farm farms
Reset filter
0 farm found farms found
 | 
Your search result

Highlights & events

Sheer variety in Passeiertal valley

Highlights

Events

Schildhöfe Passeiertal valley: born of nobility and privilege
Schildhöfe Passeier valley
Born of nobility and privilege
Observatory at Gummer: the village of the stars
Observatory at Gummer
The village of the stars
Karersee lake near Welschnofen: a gem of emerald green
Karersee lake
A gem of emerald green
Seiser Alm: Europe’s biggest Alpine meadow
Seiser Alm
Europe’s biggest Alpine meadow
Hike around the Langkofel: The wow factor
Hike around the Langkofel
The wow factor
Geisler mountain peaks: natural spectacle of the Dolomites
Geisler mountain peaks
Nature’s spectacle in the Dolomites
Sunrise on the Peitlerkofel mountain: the burning sky
Sunrise on the Peitlerkofel
The burning sky
Pisciadù 'via ferrata' at Corvara: a heart of stone
Pisciadù 'via ferrata'
A heart of stone
Messner Mountain Museum Ripa
MMM Ripa
Mountain cultural heritage in Bruneck
Reinbach waterfalls: An exhilarating experience
Reinbach waterfalls
An exhilarating experience
Mine at Prettau: The hard-working miners
Mine at Prettau
The hard-working miners
Antholzer See lake: a jewel in the middle of the mountains
Antholzer See lake
A jewel in Pustertal valley
Alpine pasture Plätzwiese: a paradise in green
Alpine pasture Plätzwiese
A paradise in green
Pragser Wildsee lake: the pearl of the Dolomites
Pragser Wildsee lake
The pearl of the Dolomites
Three Peaks: Symbol of the Dolomites
Three Peaks
Symbol of the Dolomites
Fischleintal valley: a gem in the Sexten Dolomites
Fischleintal valley
Gem in the Sexten Dolomites
Folklore Museum Dietenheim
Folklore-Museum
Farm culture up close
24-26
May
Oswald von Wolkenstein Tournament
Schlern area
08
June
Sellaronda Bike Day
Dolomites
12-16
June
International Choir Festival
Upper Pustertal valley
07
July
Dolomites Marathon
Abtei
13-27
July
Gustav Mahler Music Week
Toblach
13
July
Dolomite Superbike Race
Niederdorf
29
July
Upper Pustertal Valley Run
Innichen
August
Traditional St Bartholomew Market
Rasen-Antholz
14-22
September
‘Graukäse’ (Grey Cheese) Days in Ahrntal Valley
Ahrntal
17
September
Three Peaks Alpine Run
Sexten
Sep/Oct
Lamb Speciality Weeks
Villnöss
28-29
September
South Tyrol Speck Festival at Kronplatz
Kronplatz
28-29
September
Niederdorf Potato Festival
Niederdorf
October
Cattle Drive in Völs am Schlern
Völs am Schlern
11-12
October
‘Kastelruther Spatzen’ Festival
Kastelruth
October
Terenten Livestock Drive
Terenten
20
October
Teis Farmers’ Festival
Villnöss
26-28
October
Stegen Market
Bruneck
03
November
St. Leonard Horse Procession
Abtei/Badia
06
December
Krampus parade in Hochpustertal valley
Toblach
July
Bruneck Town Festival
Bruneck
Quiz

Quiz

Which type of farm are you?

Here we go
Roter Hahn

Find out which type of farm is right for you. Have fun!